The Fundy Stamp Collectors Club


c/o 37 Saunders Street
Riverview NB
E1B 4N8
info@fundystampclub.ca

Acknowledgments

I wish to acknowledge from the outset that the material contained in this presentation has been drawn from three sources:

An article in the Canadian Philatelic Society of Great Britain's publication "Maple Leaves" by Mr. G.A. Wallace on the first four series of the Canadian Postage Due Stamps.

A Handbook "The 1967-78 Postage Due Issue of Canada, a Definitive Study" by Mr. Andrew Chung.

A Handbook "The Canadian Postage Due Stamps" by Mr. Andrew Chung and Mr. Hans Reiche.

WHAT ARE POSTAGE DUE STAMPS

A POSTAGE DUE STAMP is a receipt, issued by the post office, for the Payment Of postage due. POSTAGE DUE is the amount the post office collects on unpaid or insufficiently prepaid mail.0 Postage due stamps are not valid for postage and are, by definition, labels.

REGULATIONS The Postmaster General Report of June 30, 1906 stated for the first time a system for accounting for short paid postage collected by postmasters. These regulations were kept unchanged for many years. Only minor changes were made.

In 1930 a letter from the Director of Financial Services to all postmasters addressed the question of short paid mail to Income Tax Division and Revenue.

In 1951 the Financial Branch issued a new directive No. 62 which dealt with the collection of postage due charges on short paid mail matter.

This directive was amended in 1953 with a new one No. 62.

The next amendment came in 1966 which added the overseas destination. An interim Directive No. 62, issued on February 27, 1954 made only minor changes.

A directive No. 216 dealt with the air mail and air surface parcel post for overseas. In November, 1951 acceptance of stamps in lieu of cash in payment for postage due was authorized in a memo from the Director of Operations.

A little later in 1951, acceptance from government agencies of OHMS, G and perforated OHMS stamps in payment for _postage due was authorized.

A revised system for business reply envelopes, cards and other returned items was issued on April 21. 1959.

THE FIRST POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

In 1906 the first set of Postage Due stamps was issued. As will be noted, some difficulties were experienced with this first set and the printers had to rework some of the dies to eliminate the problems. The printers' log book indicates this clearly.

Note I have scanned and placed some graphics of different stamps in this page. DO NOT use them as a color reference. What my scanner and screen show as Deep Reddish Lilac may show different on your screen.

THE FIRST POSTAGE DUE ISSUE OF 1906-30

First Printing PD 1
Deep Reddish Lilac
Printed by:  The American Bank Note Co.	(name changed 1923 to Canadian	Bank Note Co.)

Perforation:	12 x 12			Paper:	Horizontal wove unless stated.
Amount issued: lc 16,000,000			Plates:	1-3 Imperforate :- 200
               2c 44,178,000				1-5 Imperforate :- 200
               4c 1,487,000				1	
               5c 13,000,000				1-3 Imperforate :- 200
               lOc 1,000,000				1	


PD I    lc	Deep reddish-lilac	 Plate 1	July Ol	1906	Wet Die 1	
	la	Mauve	        	 Plate 1	mid	1907	Wet Die 1	
	lb	Slate-lilac		 Plate 1	circa	1910	Wet Die 1	
	lc	Slate-violet		 Plate 1		1913	Wet Die 1	
	Id	Grey-lilac		 Plate 1		1915	Wet Die 1	
	le	Reddish-violet		 Plate 1		1916	Wet Die 1	
	if	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 1-2		1920	Wet Die 1	
	lg	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 2	October	1924	Wet Die 1	Thin paper
	lh	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 2	1926 to	1927	Dry Die 1	
	Ii	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 3	October	1926	Dry Die 2	
	lj	Dark violet		 Plate 3	July 07	1928	Dry Die 2	

PD 2 2c	Deep reddish-lilac		 Plate 1-2	July 01	1906	Wet Die 1	
	2a	Mauve	 		 Plate 1-2	mid	1907	Wet Die 1	
	2b	Slate-lilac		 Plate 1=2	circa	1910	Wet Die 1	
	2c	Slate-lilac		 Plate ?		1912	Wet Die 1	Vertical hairlines
	2d	Slate violet		 Plate 1-2		1913	Wet Die 1	
	2e	Grey-lilac		 Plate 1-2		1915	Wet Die 1	
	2f	Reddish-violet		 Plate 3		1917	Wet Die 1	
	2g	Bright red-violet	 Plate 3	January	1917	Wet Die 1	Iathework `A'
	2h	Slate-purple		 Plate 3	March	1917	Wet Die 1	Iathework `A'
	2i	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 3		1920	Wet Die 1	
	2j	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 4	October	1924	Wet Die 1	Ihin aper
	2k	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 4	October	1924	Wet Die 1	Thini.athework `D'
	21	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 4			    Die		Lathework 'D'
	2m	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 4	mid	1925	Dry Die 1	
	2n	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 5	Dec.	1925	Dry Die 2	
	20	Reddish-lilac		 Plate 5	mid	1927	Dry Die 2	
	2p	Dark violet		 Plate 5	July 07	1928	Dry Die 2	
	24	Dark violet		 Plate 5	July 07	1928	Dry Die 2	Re-entry left frame

PD 3 4c		Dark violet		 Plate 1	July 07	1928	Dry Die 2	
	, 3a	Dark violet		 Plate 1	July 07 1928	Dry Die 2	Minor hairlines

PD4 Sc		Deep reddish-lilac	 Plate 1	July 01	1906	Wet Die 1	
	4a	Mauve			 Plate 1	mid	1907	Wet Die 1	
	4b	Slate-lilac		 Plate 1	circa	1910	Wet Die 1	
	4c	Grey-lilac		 Plate 1		1915	Wet Die 1	
	4d	Reddish violet		 Plate 1		1917	Wet Die 1	
	4e	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 1-2		1920	Wet Die 1	
	4f	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 2	October	1924	Wet Die 1	Thin paper
	4g	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 2	October	1924	Wet Die 1	Thin paper/Re-entry
	4h	Deep reddish-violet	 Plate 2-3		1926	Dry Die 2	
	4i	Dark violet		 Plate 3	July 07	1928	Dry Die 2	

PD 5 10c	Dark violet		 Plate l	July 07	1928	Dry . Die 2	



THE SECOND POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

In 1930 a second set of Postage Due stamps was issued. Difficulties with the plates and dies of the first issue could not be overcome and the need for a new issue was made known to the Post Office by the bank note companies.

Second Printing PD 6
Deep Lilac
THE GEORGE V POSTAGE DUE ISSUE of 1930-33 
Printed by      The British American Bank Note Co. 
Perforation     11 x 11
Paper 	        Horizontal wove.
Colour Standard Stanley Gibbons chart.
PD 6	6	lc	Deep-lilac	5,344.000	July 14	1930	
	6a		Deep-lilac	      200	1930	Imperfonte
	6b		Deep-lilac			1930	Re-entry to right
								frame
	6c		Bright-violet			1933	

PD 7	7	2c	Deep-lilac	10,758,000 	Aug. 08 1930	
	7a		Deep-lilac	       200	1930	Imperforate
	7b		Deep-lilac			1930	Re-entry to right
								frame
	7c		Deep-lilac			1930	Re-entry to left
								frame
	7d		Deepdilac	100 to 400	1930	Imperf. horizontally
	7e		Slate-lilac			?	
	7f		Bright-violet			1933	

PD 8	4c		Deep-lilac	2,442,000	Oct. 14	1930	
	8a		Deep-lilac	200		1930	Imperforate
	8b		Deep reddish-lilac		Dec. 12	1931	
	8c		Bright-violet			1933	

PD 9	Sc		Deep red-lilac	523,000	Dec. 12	1931	
	9a		Bright-violet			1933	

PD 10	lOc		Deepdilac	309,000	Aug. 24	1932	
	l0a		Deep-lilac	200		1932	Imperforate
	lOb		Deep-lilac			1932	Re-entry to right
								frame
	lOc		Bright-violet			1933	

THE THIRD POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

The first bilingual Postage Due stamps were ordered by the Post Office on November 14, 1933. A small quantity of the 4-cent value was received by the Post Office for issue on December 12, 1933, but the bulk of the stamps for the 2- cent, 4-cent and 10-cent values only arrived at the Post Office on December 14, 1933. A sample block of four of the 2-cent value was sent to the Post Office from the Toronto Star newspaper on December 11, 1933, or nine days before the ac- tual issue. This block contained the following words on the left side of the block in the margin: "Factory Proof OK 11 /12/33." The Post Office did not know what this meant and was not certain if it was added by the Bank Note Company; nor were they sure how this block got to Toronto. The papers for this set vary from thick to thin with a dark brown to pale yellow gum.

Third Printing PD 6
Deep Violet

THE Bi-LINGUAL ISSUE of 1933-35
Printed by       The British American Bank Note Co. 
Perforation 	 11 x 11
Paper 		 Horizontal wove. 
Colour Standard  Stanley Gibbons chart						
PD 11	lc	Deep-violet	2,070,000	May OS	1934
	lla	Deep-violet	      150	May OS	1934

PD 12	2c	Deep violet	4,390,000	Dec. 20	1933
	12a	Slate-lilac		?	1934
	12b	Bright-violet		?	1934

PD 13	4c	Deep-violet	1,900,000	Dec. 12	1933

PD 14	10c	Deep-violet	500,000	Dec. 20	1933

THE FOURTH POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

The 1935 issue, as this set is sometimes referred to, remained in use until 1967 with additional values being issued in 1948, 1957 and 1965. On February 9th, 1935 the Canadian Bank Note Company informed the Post Office that they would be in a position on April 1st, 1935 to commence delivery of the four denominations of this new set of Postage Dues - the 1-cent, 2-cent, 4-cent and 10-cent. Actual delivery started on that day to the Financial Branch.

In 1943 the question was raised in Toronto as to the need for additional values of 5-cent, 6-cent and 8-cent Postage Due stamps. The 5-cent and 6-cent were subsequently issued but the 8-cent value was never prepared. The cost of pro- ducing these stamps was questioned due to the fairly small numbers which were now used. Post Office records provide an interesting insight into this. A 3-cent Postage Due cost estimate was obtained and the price quoted was 0.333 cent per 1000 stamps if ordered in very large quantities. However, the cost of produc- ing smaller quantities of approximately 300,000 was 0.50-cent per 1000 stamps. This was thought to be too high for the small quantity required. Thin papers have been listed is some philatelic handbooks but this could not be confirmed.

Fourth Print PD 15
Deep Lilac

THE DATED DIE ISSUE OF 1935-67
Printed by 	The Canadian Bank Note Co. 
Perforation 	12x 12 
Paper 
Colour Standard  Stanley Gibbons chart.

     PD 15	1 c	Deep dull-lilac	no record  Oct. 14	1935	
	15a		Deep dull-lilac	100	   Oct. 14	1935	Imperforate
	l5b		Reddish-violet		   Nov.		1935	
	15c		Plum (shades)			circa	1943	
	15d		Deep-lilac				1948	
	15e		Deep-1~1ac			from	1959	Hi-brite paper

     PD 16	2c	Deep dull-lilac		   Sept. 09	1935	
	16a		Deep dull-lilac	100	   Sept. 09	1935	Imperforatc
	16b		Reddish-violet		   Dec.		1935	
	16c		Plum (shades)			circa	1943	
	16d		Deep4ilac				1948	
	16e		Deep-lilac			from	1959	Hi-brite paper

	PD 17	3c	Deep-lilac			April	1965	

    PD18	4c	Deep dull-lilac			July 02	1935	
	18a		Deep dull-lilac	100		July 02	1935	Imperforate
	18b		Reddish-violet			Dec. 14	1935	
	18c		Plum				circa	1943	
	18d		Deep4ilac				1948	

    PD 19	Sc	Deep-iilac			Aug. 11	1948	

    PC 20	6c	Deep-lilac				1957	
	20a		Deep-lilac			from	1959	Hi-brite paper

    PD 21	lOc	Deep dull-lilac		Sept. 16	1935	
	21a		Deep dull-lilac	100	Sept. 16	1935	Imperforate
	21b		Reddish-violet			Nov.	1935	
	21c		Plum				circa	1943	
	21d		Deep-lilac			1948	

THE FIFTH POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

The Fourth Postage Due issue was in use for over three decades, but in 1967 the Post Office commissioned a completely new series of Postage Dues produced with a contemporary design. This and the following series were called the "Red" Postage Dues because all were issued in red. The actual issued stamps were a rose carmine shade although the proofs are a slightly darker red. Seven values were printed corresponding to the Fourth Postage Due issue.

Fifth Printing J 21
Very Dull

PRINTERS: The Canadian Bank Note Company
PLATES ISSUED: Only one plate was used for each value. Each plate contained six panes of one hundred stamps, a total of six hundred stamps. Only the four outside panes contained the plate inscriptions with each pane of one hundred having only one inscription
Stamp Size: The design area measures 21 mm by 17 mm and the stamp measures 24.5 mm x 21.5 mm.
PAPER: The paper used was uncoated.
PRINTING METHOD: The stamps were printed by lithography.
PERFORATIONS: Line perforations, 12 by 12.
GUM: Dextrine gum.
VARIETIES: Many colour dots can be noted but most are not constant anc pear on only a few sheets and then disappear. This is typical of lithograph.

THE SIXTH POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

In 1967 the Post Office adopted and standardized the size format of commemorative and definitive stamps to the Modular or metric size. In 1969, a new set of the "Red" Postage Due stamps was issued to conform to this new metric or "Modular" size. This set also added two new values and replaced four of the Fifth Postage Due Issue. There was very little demand of the 5-cent value and it was withdrawn after a short time.

Sixth Printing J34
High Brite

PRINTERS: The Canadian Bank Note Company

PLATES ISSUED: Only one plate was used for each value. Each pane con- tained one hundred stamps. The marginal inscription was now on all four cor- ners of each pane.

Stamp Size: The dimensions of the design area are 20 mm by 15.5 mm and those of the stamp 24 mm by 20 mm.

PAPER: The paper was uncoated.

PRINTING METHOD: The method of printing these values was by lithography.

PERFORATIONS: Line perforation, 12 by 12.

GUM: The gum was Dextrine.

THE SEVENTH POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

During the years 1973 to 1974 another set of "Red" Postage Dues was released with a different gum. Prior to 1972, the adhesive used on virtually all Canadian postage stamps was dextrine but beginning in 1972, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gum became the primary adhesive for all postage stamps. In 1973 this change began to appear on new printings of the Postage Dues. A 16-cent, was added and the 5 cent value was deleted.

Seventh Printing
High Brite

PRINTERS: The Canadian Bank Note Company.

PLATES ISSUED: One plate was issued for each value, similar to the previous two issues.

Stamp Size: The dimensions of the design were 20 mm by 15.5 mm and the stamp 24 mm by 20 mm.

PAPER: An uncoated paper was used.

PRINTING METHOD: The stamps were printed by lithography.

PERFORATIONS: Line perforation, 12 by 12.

GUM: Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA).

VARIETIES: The only varieties recorded for this set are the 4-cent printed on the gummed side, and the V shaped white spot above the third A of Canada on the 16-cent value.

The 2-cent was printed January 27, 1972. The 6-cent was printed January 27, 1972. There appears to be some error in the records of the Post Office regarding the 10-cent value. The 10-cent is listed as having been printed October 28, 1971 with 5,000,000. However, another record shows the printing as November 17, 1972 with 4,000,000. No PVA gum stamps were issued before 1973 and if this quantity should belong to the Sixth Issue, it would make the total quantity 10,000,000, as it appears that the October printing was a second printing for the Sixth Issue.

THE EIGHTH POSTAGE DUE ISSUE

A final change was made in 1977. This time the perforations were changed. Between 1968 and 1973, Canadian postage stamps were perforated by the comb perforation.

The difference between line and comb perforation can be found in the intersection of the horizontal and vertical perforations. The perforations meet exactly with comb perforation while in the older line perforation method they do not.

As values were printed (and new ones introduced) this new comb perforation was used. Three new values were added but four values were deleted. The once obsolete 5-cent value was re-issued.

Eighth Printing
Dull

PRINTERS: The Canadian Bank Note Company

PLATES ISSUED: Only one plate was used for each value as before.

Stamp Size: The design of the stamp measures 20 mm by 15.5 mm stamp measures 24 mm by 20 mm.

Paper: The paper was uncoated.

PRINTING METHOD: The stamps were printed by lithography.

PERFORATIONS: Comb perforation, 12.5 by 12.

GUM: Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)

VARIETIES: A small dot in the form of a hickey exists on the top of the 8-cent. Although a reasonable number were noted, this may not be a constant plate flaw.

THE FLUORESCENCE PAPER

The following table was published in the 1967-78 Postage Due Issue of Canada by Mr. Chung and is reproduced here to show the various levels of fluorescence, as well as the ribbed effect, which have been noted on the four different red Postage Dues.

REFERENCE CODE	FLUORESCENT LEVEL 

	H1	 Hibrite +
	H3	 Hibrite -
	F	 Fluorescent 
	D	 Dull
	V	 Very Dull
	RE	 Ribbed Effect



S = Scott Standard Catalog  1980
CS = Canada Specialized Catalog 1980
L= Lymans Standard Catalog 1980


	Catalogue Nos.				Reference Nos.	
 S   CS New    L	Value     H1     H3	F     D	     V       RE
Fifth Postage Due Issue					
J21   D22     J21	1 cent				     =
J22   D23     J22	2 cent			a     =      =
J23   D24     J23	3 cent				     =
J24   D25     J24	4 cent			      =      =
J25   D26     J25	5 cent                        =      =
J26   D27     J26	6 cent			      =	     =
J27   D28     J27	10 cent		              =      =




 S   CS New    L	Value     H1     H3	F     D	     V       RE
Sixth Postage Due Issue					
J28   D29     J28	1 cent		              =
J31   D30     J29	4 cent			      =
J32a  D31     J30	5 cent		              =
J34   D32     J31	8 cent	  =		      =
J35   D33     J32	10 cent			      =
J36   D34     J33	12 cent	  =                   =


 S   CS New    L	Value     H1     H3	F     D	     V       RE
Seventh Postage Due Issue
-	D35	J34	1 cent		 =	      =              =
J29	D36	J35	2 cent		 =	      =              =
J30	D37	J36	3 cent	         =            =              =
-	D38	J37	4 cent	         =            =              =
J33	D39	J38	6 cent	         =      =     =              =
-	D40	J39	8 cent                  =     =
-	D41	J40	10 cent		        =     =              b
-	D42	J41	12 cent                 =     =
J37	D43	J42	16 cent                 =     =



 S   CS New    L	Value     H1     H3	F     D	     V       RE
Eighth Postage Due Issue			       
J28a	D44	J43	1 cent		              c	
J31 a	D45	J44	4 cent			      c
J32	D46	J45	5 cent			      c
J34a	D47	J46	8 cent			      c
J35a	D48	J47	10 cent			      c
J36a	D49	J48	12 cent			      c
J38	D50	J49	30 cent			      c
J39	D51	J50	24 cent			      c
J40	052	J51	50 cent			      c
Notes to Table
a The fluorescence of the paper falls between FLUORESCENT and DULL 
b 'Dull' as most RIBBED-EFFECT papers are, the paper is FLUORESCENT 
c The fluorescence of each value varies slightly; all are DULL

FLUORESCENCE

Mentioned quite frequently under this topic is the term FLUORESCENCE (adj. FLUORESCENT). With regard to paper varieties. fluorescence is the degree of light emitted from a sample of paper as it is exposed to a long wave ultra violet light source or a blacklight. The reaction ceases once the lamp is turned off.

Fluorescence is best described by a four level Paper Flo- rescence Scale. The four levels, ranging from HIBRITE to VERY DULL, are discussed below.

a) THE FOUR MAJOR LEVELS

HIBRITE A paper of high fluorescence.

FLUORESCENT One level below HIBRITE; a paper of medium fluorescence.

DULL One level below FLUORESCENT; a paper of low fluorescence.

VERY DULL One level below DULL; a paper of no fluorescence.

b) RIBBED AND RIBBED EFFECT PAPERS

RIBBED A paper that is distinctly corrugated is described as a RIBBED paper.

RIBBED EFFECT A paper that is lightly corrugated is described as a RIBBED EFFECT paper.

THE PAPER FLUORESCENCE SCALE SUGGESTED EXAMPLES

Avoid in a fluorescence collection used or cancelled copies which are heavily cancelled or on coloured envelopes. Furthermore, cancelled copies should be left on piece to preserve the paper's original fluorescence. Artificial changes can occur if the cancel- lation ink or coloured dye from the wrapper becomes soluble in water.

FLUORESCENCE EXAMPLE COMMENTS
HIBRITE+ 6¢ (black) Centennial
coil; (468B)
HIBRITE 89 Queen plate 1
(593)
Plate 1 also exists on a RIBBED EFFECT
paper. Do not use it as the sample.
FLUORESCENT 2e Laurier; plate 1
(587)
Plate 1 also exists on a HIBRITE paper.
Do not use it as the sample.
DULL 2¢ Laurier plate 2
(587)
Plate 2 exists both smooth and RIBBED.
Both may be used as the sample.
VERY DULL any early printing of
the Centennial low
values
any one of N`s 450 to 458.
R1BBED EFFECT 8¢ Queen plate 2
(593)
Plate 2 is the RIBBED EFFECT paper of
the Caricatures

A GUMLESS PROBLEM

An interesting problem arises in cataloguing non mint postage due stamps of the 2nd and 3rd Set if the gum has been moistened or washed off entirely.

A four step analysis presents a simple solution to the gumless problem.

STEP 1      Is the stamp one of   -------- NO--------- Discontinue the analysis
            the following values 
            1, 4, 8, 10, 12
                  |
                 Yes
                  |

STEP 2      Is the stamp from   -----------NO--------- Discontinue the analysis 
            the 2nd or 3rd Set                         (refer to TABLES I
                                                        I - 2 and I - 3)
                  |
                 Yes
                  | 

STEP 3      Are there any traces   --------Yes-------  Discontinue the analysis 
            of gum on the stamp                        PROBLEM SOLVED 
                                                       (refer to TABLE 1 -2) 
                  |
                 No
                  |

STEP 4a  What is the fluores-	                   If the paper is H1 H3 F V or
         cence of the stamp	                   RE, discontinue the analysis
                 |                                     (refer to TABLE I -6)
                 |
                 |
                 OR
                 |                                 If the paper is D, continue on 
                 |                                 to the next end final step
                 |


STEP 4b  What is the bright-                       DEX pre- gummed paper is often
         ness of the stamp's 	                   creamy or off- White
         paper under room 	
         lighting                                  PVA pre -gummed paper Is always
                                                   White 

Stamp Size Chart



                                                     DESIGN	                  STAMP

DESIGN and	 REGULAR SIZE       1st Set       21 mm x 17 mm            24 1/2 mm x 21 1/2 mm
STAMP SIZE      (non -metric)							(approx.)

TABLE            MODULAR SIZE       2nd	Set       20 mm x 15 1/2 mm        24 mm x 20 mm
I-1                                 3rd	Set
                                    4th	Set		

As Canada was celebrating her Centennial well over a decade ego, the post office adopted end standardized the size format of commemora tive and definitive stamps from the Regular size to the Modular.

The first stamp to be issued in the metric or Modular size was the Venier Memorial Issue of 1967. Since the Gray Jay Special Issue of 1968, the Modular size popularized all commemorative, special issue, and new definitive stamps.

Modular postage due stamps did not appear until the following year. The 2nd Set added two new values and replaced four of the 1st or non- metric Set.


								DESCRIPTION
GUM	DEXTRINE	1st Set                 	golden yellowish in colour, rich
	(DEX)	        2nd Set	                        in texture, end very shiny
TABLE			
I-2	POLYVINYL	3rd Set	                        colourless and generally lustreless
	ALCOHOL (PVA)	4th Set	
     
Prior to 1971, dextrine gum was a popular adhesive far many commemorative and definitive stamps until the gradual appearance of poly vinyl alcohol gum less than a year later. Since 1972, polyvinyl alcohol gum has been the primary adhesive for all stamps. The change from the farmer gum to the latter came with the release of the 3rd Set add- ing e new value and withdrawing one between 1973 end 1974.

Perforation

LINE	1st Set
 	2nd Set	12 x 12 
	3rd set

the Intersection or the 
horizontal and vertical 
perforations do not 
exactly meet


comb	4th Set	12 1/2 x 12

the intersection of the 
horizontal and vertical 
perforations meets 
exactly
The first comb perforated stamp was the Voyage of the Nonsuch commemorative Issued in 1968. By 1973, the line method of perforating stamps became a thing of the past' as the comb method gradually perforated all commemorative and definitive stamps.

The postage due stamps were not comb perforated until the issuance of the 4th Set adding three new values and replacing four between 1977 end 1978. A once obsolete value was re issued.

Acknowledgments

I wish to acknowledge from the outset that the material contained in this presentation has been drawn from three sources:

An article in the Canadian Philatelic Society of Great Britain's publication "Maple Leaves" by Mr. G.A. Wallace on the first four series of the Canadian Postage Due Stamps.

A Handbook "The 1967-78 Postage Due Issue of Canada, a Definitive Study" by Mr. Andrew Chung.

A Handbook "The Canadian Postage Due Stamps" by Mr. Andrew Chung and Mr. Hans Reiche.

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